SALT Blog

Legal Clinics Under Attack

Written by:  Steven Bender Within the last week SALT defended the Maryland law school environmental clinic from legislative attack seeking to condition release of public funds on disclosure of client names and other confidential information. SALT’s efforts are described at https://www.saltlaw.org/contents/view/universityofmaryland. This weekend the New York Times detailed the current legislative and judicial onslaught against law clinics across the country. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/04/us/04lawschool.html?emc=eta1.

SHADRACH, BLECKER, and LODOWICK POST

Written by:  Jeff Pokorak The Carnegie report exhorts us to “put the client back into legal education.” I know many have done great work surfacing the biographies of clients and litigants in cases before our students.  From a fuller contextualization of the litigants Jesse Pierson and  Lodowick Post to the sad path of Ernesto Miranda’s life, there is a wealth of information available to help us reanimate our classes with the (ghosts) of the case clients. But what I want to address here is the casual way in which we forget to name or humanize in our efforts to diminish or aggrandize.  Not only the common use of the words “defendant” or “victim” in criminal courts….  But recent writings of others made me wonder: Do slaves or former slaves actually have… Continue »

The Why, Who, and the How of the New SALT Blog

Written by: Angela Onwuachi-Willig A  few years ago, at a retreat where we set certain short and long term goals, the SALT Board agreed that SALT would have a blog.  None of us knew much about blogs at that time, but we were persuaded that alternative methods of reaching the public to provide information about issues of social justice and human rights should be an integral part of our agenda as activist progressives. There are many opportunities for SALT members to speak out. We have our classrooms, and SALT, through its teaching conferences, has advocated for teaching that is activist, inclusive, and self conscious in focusing attention on issues of social justice. In our institutions, we can sponsor teach-ins, conferences, and symposia.  As legal scholars, we can write and publish… Continue »