SALT Blog

SALT Announces Co-Presidents Elect, Nominees to Board of Governors

    SALT is proud to announce the following Co-Presidents Elect and Nominees to the Board of Governors.   The Nominees will be presented as a slate at the Members’ Meeting on Friday October 2, 2015 at 6 p.m. Pacific Time at the Doubletree by Hilton Hotel in Anaheim, CA.    The Co-Presidents Elect will serve a two-year term starting on January 1, 2016, and elected Board members start their three-year terms on January 1. Only those SALT members current in their dues as of September 15 may vote in the election. If you are unsure about the status of your membership, please e-mail your name and school to info@saltlaw.org before September 15.  If you would like to vote by proxy, please send... Continue »

SALT Supports Law for Black Lives Conference in NYC

SALT was proud to be one of the sponsors supporting Law For Black Lives, a national gathering of lawyers, law students, legal workers, and jailhouse lawyers committed to building a world where #BlackLivesMatter. The Law For Black Lives program conference was held July 31- Aug. 1 in Harlem. It united legal advocates from around the country to explore ways to support the growing Movement for Black Lives.  The event was organized by a planning committee that included representatives from the Center for Constitutional Rights, Dream Defenders, the National Bar Association, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People LDF and the Community Justice Project. Discussions covered a wide range of issues including abusive policing, environmental justice and transgender rights. Continue »

SALT at ABA Council Meeting; Status Quo on Externships, For Now

The Council of the ABA’s Section on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar met in Chicago July 31 to consider among other items the proposed deletion of Interpretation 305-2, which prohibits law schools granting credit for paid externships. Along with other organizations such as the Clinical Legal Education (CLEA), we filed comments opposing the deletion of Interpretation 305-2, on the grounds that making the externship an employment relationship would dilute the educational value that an externship for credit would obtain. The Council took the suggestions of SALT and CLEA to engage in a holistic review of all the standards governing externships before removing Interpretation 305-2.  The Council, and SALT, will continue examining best practices for externships in upcoming meetings. Continue »

SALT Names Annual Great Teacher, Human Rights Honorees

  Professor Susan Bryant CUNY School of Law Professor Jean Koh Peters Yale Law School Sherrilyn Ifill NAACP LDF and Maryland Law   At its upcoming Annual Dinner to be held on January 8, 2016 in New York City, SALT will honor three champions of its mission of justice, diversity and teaching excellence.  Professor Susan Bryant from CUNY School of Law and Professor Jean Peters from Yale Law School will share the SALT Great Teacher Award honors.  The M. Shanara Gilbert Human Rights Award will be presented to Sherrilyn Ifill, President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund (NAACP-LDF), and a faculty member at the University of Maryland Francis Carey School of Law. The Great Teacher Award recognizes Bryant and Koh Peters for their... Continue »

SALT COMMENTS ON DEPT. OF EDUCATION’s REVISED PAY AS YOU EARN REGULATION

Statement on the Proposed Changes to the Department of Education’s REPAYE Plan August 10, 2015 The Society of American Law Teachers (SALT), one of the largest independent national organizations of law teachers, supports efforts to aggressively respond to the problem of student debt in this country. As the Department of Education (DOE) explores steps to improve debt relief, it should take every step possible to open more avenues for student loan borrowers to participate fully in the American economy. SALT encourages the DOE to allow all Direct Loan borrowers to cap their monthly payments at 10% of income, and to prevent ballooning loan balances by limiting interest accrual for borrowers with low income relative to their debt. Furthermore, SALT... Continue »

SALT Proudly Counts Professor Derrick Bell Among Its Founders

SALT proudly counts the late  Professor Derrick Bell among its founders.  Professor Bell, who pioneered the study of Critical Race Theory, was a faculty member at Harvard Law School in 1974 when he, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and 31 other law professors founded SALT “to convey our students an appreciation of the important role lawyers could play in helping repair tears in our society,” in the words of Justice Ginsburg, who remembered the founding on the occasion of SALT’s 40th birthday celebration in 2014.  Professor Bell, who passed away in 2011, taught at several law schools over the course of his 40 year career in the academy, including several as protests over the lack of faculty diversity at his home... Continue »

The American Psychological Association Resolution of August 7, 2015: One More Milepost on the Road to Full Accountability for United States Torturers

  By Benjamin G. Davis, Associate Professor of Law, University of Toledo College of Law   As Martin Luther King, Jr. said, the arc of the moral universe bends towards justice.  On August 7, it bent a little more that way with the monumental passage of the American Psychological Association Resolution banning psychologists from torture.  This largest worldwide organization of 130,000 psychologists, after a ten year struggle to bring to light the collusion of the association and key members in the torture, decided to chart a fundamentally new course with this resolution.   It will have impact in the national security establishment and will be known to the state licensing boards that license psychologists.   It will assist international efforts around the world by psychologists to resist their participation in… Continue »

LONGTIME SALT BOARD MEMBER MARC POIRIER REMEMBERED

Marc Poirier, a law professor at Seton Hall Law and a really wonderful human being, passed away Sunday after a brave battle with cancer. Tributes about his work in the academy have been populating a wide range of legal academy blogs this week. After all, he was an exceptionally bright scholar with diverse interests that ranged from property theory to LGBT issues. He was also, amazingly, able to successfully blend the two. His article, The Cultural Property Claim within the Same-Sex Marriage Controversy, was widely popular. He also wrote in the fields of environmental resource management, sexuality and the law and gender. One L in a Different Voice: Becoming a Gay Male Feminist at Harvard Law School should be... Continue »

State Violence and Psychologists: the American Psychological Association, Police Killings and Torture

By Benjamin G. Davis, Associate Professor of Law, University of Toledo College of Law This week the American Psychological Association (APA) is holding its annual meeting in turmoil resulting from the scathing independent review – the Independent Review Relating to APA Ethics Guidelines, National Security Interrogations, and Torture or the Hoffman report – of the role of the APA leadership and specific present and former members in enabling torture in the War on Terror in the period just after Abu Ghraib came to light in 2004.  The willingness of the APA to provide cover for the torture is at the heart of the discussion.  There have been resignations and firing and pushback by groups such as the Society of Military Psychologists to defend what was done in that period.  The… Continue »

Advantaging the Advantaged Once Again

By Hazel Weiser Our system of funding higher education through grants and loans might be exacerbating income inequality, especially along racial lines. In the 21st century, a college degree is the new high school diploma, necessary to acquire any economic independence in a post-manufacturing era, although certainly no guarantee. And according to a Harris Poll survey, the overwhelming majority of college bound students identify economic reasons for attending: 91 percent want to improve employment opportunities; 90 percent want to make more money; and 89 percent want to get a good job.  All makes sense, right? Increasingly low income students, including students of color, flock to college to earn their swipe at the American Dream. To facilitate these aspirations, the federal government invests $140... Continue »